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Posts Tagged ‘digital advertising’

I think it’s safe to say that myself along with millions of other people across the country cannot wait for the release of the first movie in The Hunger Games trilogy.

I already have my midnight premiere movie ticket bought (hence the inspiration for this post), and I am probably going to have to reread the book again before the movie comes out.

Over the past months, buzz has gradually been building about this movie online. Trailers have been released one by one which are slowly giving fans a sneak peak into the movie. We are all expecting an action packed movie that is as unique as the book.

The way the movie is being marketed is quite interesting and unique as well. A new set of digital advertisements caught my eye today where characters from the book are featured in advertisements for fictional beauty products. Here is a screen shot of one, but click the link here to see the full fledged ads that have some very cool digital effects! They even automatically have options to share the ads to Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr accounts.

The ads all link back to the CapitolCouture.pn website, one of the many used to market the movie; this one in particular offers exclusive content to fans. The original microsite, thecapitol.pn, is more interactive and assigns users to one of the twelve districts and simulates an experience to keep them engaged and excited about the coming film. It then sends out blasts via twitter and using hashtags to spread the buzz even further.

What other different tactics has Lionsgate Entertainment used to market this new film trilogy? Will you be there when the movie premieres?

May the odds be ever in your favor.

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The QR code is no longer a term that makes the majority of people go, “Say what?”

Now it’s the term that makes people go “You  mean those little barcode thingys… right?”

As a growing digital trend, it’s growth has been much slower than others and has yet to really catch on at a societal level. Brands have yet to realize its potential from an engagement and advertising standpoint.

But the other day, I ran across an ad campaign for different iPhone apps. The blog I found them on dubbed themphygital,” which later research explained as physical to digital engagment. The ads are simple print ads, but they creatively inspire you to pull out your phone, scan the very nontraditional QR code, and download the app.

Ever since the QR code started to become a more well-known tech term in society, I’ve wondered when the concept of using it for advertising was really going to catch on. No one seems to have really mastered it yet, but when someone does, I can only imagine the effects it is going to have on mobile engagement with brands. It will be interesting to see where this idea of “phygital” advertising can take it.

 

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Interactive doesn’t mean it’s digital, digital media is just a good way to make it interactive.

I recently read an e-book that had a short section entitled “Interactive doesn’t mean it’s digital,” and I found it to be very insightful and make some great points. (You can find the free download of the e-book entitled “Oh My God, What Happened and What Should I Do?” here)

A common misconception about interactive advertising is that is has to be online and that is has to involve some kind of digital interaction, like a click. But quite simply, an interactive ad is something that your target audience interacts with (duh). How do you get your audience to interact with your TV spot or video? How do you get your audience to head to your website after viewing your print ad? How do you execute a gorilla marketing campaign to get your audience involved with the brand? Interaction can be achieved in many ways other than digital.

After reading this section, I immediately thought of a viral ad for Skittles that I was exposed to this past summer while I was working for Proximity Worldwide.

This ad is a perfect example of how to make your ad simple and interactive without requiring the user to click anything or go anywhere. The ad is somewhat creepy, yet so intriguing you will not be able to take your finger off of the screen or stop it. With almost 5 million hits, I think Skittles and Proximity Canada would call this a definite success.

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